Yale Center for Teaching and Learning

Online Learning for Alumni

Yale currently offers online courses on a variety of platforms including Coursera, Open Yale Courses, YouTube, and iTunes U. Yale’s philosophy of teaching and learning begins with the goal of providing a broadly based and highly disciplined approach to higher education.

Yale on Coursera:

Yale has partnered with Coursera, a MOOC platform, to amplify the impact of great teaching beyond the campus. Coursera allows free access to high-quality educational materials with a social, interactive approach designed to assess learning.

Open Yale Courses:

Open Yale Courses (OYC) provides lectures and other materials from selected Yale College courses to the public. The courses span the full range of liberal arts disciplines, including humanities, social sciences, and physical and biological sciences.   Registration and enrollment is not required and course do not offer credit hours, degrees, or certificates.

Yale on YouTube:

The Yale Courses channel on YouTube provides entry into the core of the University via its classrooms and academic programs. This channel includes complete sets of lectures from the Open Yale Courses initiative. Complementary syllabi, transcripts, and other resources may also be accessed from the Open Yale Courses site.

Yale on iTunesU:

Listen to Yale faculty, visitors, and performers from a variety of on-campus events and lectures.

Capitalism: Success, Crisis, and Reform

In this course, we will seek to interpret capitalism using ideas from biological evolution: firms pursuing varied strategies and facing extinction when those strategies fail are analogous to organisms struggling for survival in nature. For this reason, it is less concerned with ultimate judgment of capitalism than with the ways it can be shaped to fit our more specific objectives–for the natural environment, public health, alleviation of poverty, and development of human potential in every child. Each book we read will be explicitly or implicitly an argument about good and bad consequences of capitalism.

Find this course on: YouTube  iTunes U  

Modern Poetry

This course covers the body of modern poetry, its characteristic techniques, concerns, and major practitioners. The authors discussed range from Yeats, Eliot, and Pound, to Stevens, Moore, Bishop, and Frost with additional lectures on the poetry of World War One, Imagism, and the Harlem Renaissance. Diverse methods of literary criticism are employed, such as historical, biographical, and gender criticism.

Find this course on: YouTube  

Freshman Organic Chemistry II

This is a continuation of Freshman Organic Chemistry I (CHEM 125a), the introductory course on current theories of structure and mechanism in organic chemistry for students with excellent preparation in chemistry and physics. This semester treats simple and complex reaction mechanisms, spectroscopy, organic synthesis, and some molecules of nature.

Find this course on: YouTube  iTunes U  

Autism and Related Disorders

The Yale Seminar on Autism and Related Disorders is the United States’ first undergraduate course of its kind. The goal of this series is to make all of the lecture content and supporting materials available online for free for anyone who desires to learn about Autsim Spectrum Disorders.

For Yale undergraduates, the class consists of a weekly seminar on diagnosis and assessment, etiology and treatment of children, adolescents and adults with autism and related disorders of socialization.

Please visit http://autism.yale.edu for more information.

Find this course on: YouTube  iTunes U  

Mitigating Agriculture's Impact

This course will examine a range of solutions that address the impacts of agriculture. Impact subject areas will be focused primarily on the environment (air, soil, water, land use, climate change, biodiversity), although social justice and human health issues will also be touched upon. Examined mitigation strategies will include agro-ecosystem best management practices, new technologies, and supply chain relationships, among others. Lecture content will focus on specific case studies as much as possible.

The course is divided into four modules which will each focus on a single commodity that represents a different set of impacts and mitigation strategies. These commodities are beef, aqua-cultured salmon, palm oil, and fresh-sold tomatoes. Brief contextual reference to the economic and social importance of each commodity will be made at the beginning of each module. By doing a deep dive in each of these modules, students will gain a significant appreciation for the mitigation strategy opportunities available in the production, processing, and distribution specific to an agricultural resource type.

Find this course on: YouTube  iTunes U  

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