Yale Center for Teaching and Learning

Catalog

Mitigating Agriculture's Impact

This course will examine a range of solutions that address the impacts of agriculture. Impact subject areas will be focused primarily on the environment (air, soil, water, land use, climate change, biodiversity), although social justice and human health issues will also be touched upon. Examined mitigation strategies will include agro-ecosystem best management practices, new technologies, and supply chain relationships, among others. Lecture content will focus on specific case studies as much as possible.

The course is divided into four modules which will each focus on a single commodity that represents a different set of impacts and mitigation strategies. These commodities are beef, aqua-cultured salmon, palm oil, and fresh-sold tomatoes. Brief contextual reference to the economic and social importance of each commodity will be made at the beginning of each module. By doing a deep dive in each of these modules, students will gain a significant appreciation for the mitigation strategy opportunities available in the production, processing, and distribution specific to an agricultural resource type.

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Freshman Organic Chemistry I

This is the first semester in a two-semester introductory course focused on current theories of structure and mechanism in organic chemistry, their historical development, and their basis in experimental observation. The course is open to freshmen with excellent preparation in chemistry and physics, and it aims to develop both taste for original science and intellectual skills necessary for creative research.

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Milton

This class is a study of Milton’s poetry, with attention paid to his literary sources, his contemporaries, his controversial prose, and his decisive influence on the course of English poetry. Throughout the course, Professor Rogers explores the advantages and limitations of a diverse range of interpretive techniques and theoretical concerns in Milton scholarship and criticism. Lectures include close readings of lyric and epic poetry, prose, and letters; biographical inquiries; examinations of historical and political contexts; and engagement with critical debates.

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France Since 1871

This course covers the emergence of modern France. Topics include the social, economic, and political transformation of France; the impact of France’s revolutionary heritage, of industrialization, and of the dislocation wrought by two world wars; and the political response of the Left and the Right to changing French society.

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Introduction to Theory of Literature

This is a survey of the main trends in twentieth-century literary theory. Lectures will provide background for the readings and explicate them where appropriate, while attempting to develop a coherent overall context that incorporates philosophical and social perspectives on the recurrent questions: what is literature, how is it produced, how can it be understood, and what is its purpose?

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